Tier 1 National Org

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  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    10:19am

    When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

    But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

    “This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

    About half of American adults take at least one prescription medicine, and as many as 25% of adults take four or more prescription drugs. Many, despite having health insurance, are in the same boat: They can hardly afford to pay for their medications and are forced to make impossible choices.

    For far too long, drug companies have jacked up prices seemingly at their whim. Americans pay 250% more for prescription medications than citizens of other wealthy nations. It’s high time to do something about it.

    President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda calls for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which would have the effect of lower drug prices for all Americans, not just retirees. Congress is negotiating a proposal to do just that.

    While some members of Congress are standing in the way, Americans strongly support empowering the federal government to negotiate lower drug prices. According to a West Health/Gallup survey, “8 in 10 Americans prefer major government action to control prices over concerns about it hurting innovation and competition from the pharmaceutical industry.”

    spending bill in the House of Representatives includes a provision requiring Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and make sure Americans don’t pay higher prices for some prescription drugs domestically than overseas. It could save the federal government around $500 billion over a decade, money that would help...

    Read more
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